Medication Assisted Treatment

Medication Assisted Treatment

Addiction is a Disease

Addiction is a condition in which a person takes harmful substances knowing the consequences that it will have on the body. Unfortunately, in our society, too often it is just assumed that those who use drugs are bad people. It is high time to change that way of thinking and consider that addiction is more like a disease than anything else. That being said, it should also be treated in a similar manner to chronic disease. Additionally, addiction should be considered a disease because of the way opioid use can seriously affect brain function. By treating this with medication we can hope to see this opioid epidemic decrease and see people in maintenance.

Where do I start?

Greene County Family Planning (GCFP) is a pioneer clinic that is unique among its peers.

  • GCFP provides patients with access to same day, basic peer recovery services and Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in addition to many other services.
  • Total abstinence is NOT a requirement to receive MAT at GCFP, and our efforts embrace the harm reduction approach to more effectively serve patients.
  • GCFP provides Buprenorphine/Naloxone, and it allows people who use opioids to be treated more effectively and better pave their path to recovery.

What choices do I have?

MAT can include many different types of medications and treatment options, but Greene County Family Planning focuses primarily on Buprenorphine/Naloxone.

  • Due to the lack of resources in the county, a Methadone Clinic is hard to find
  • Another option is Vivitrol, but the person has to be off substances before 1st dose
  • GCFP prescribes Buprenorphine/Naloxone to meet patients half way and provide them with a more accessible option that will always be within their reach should they choose to seek it out.

Is MAT safe?

MAT is quite safe, and the reason why is because there are many different options for individualized treatment that will be tailored to the patient.

  • There are medications that work specifically with pregnant women who use opioids that are seeking recovery, and options that are better suited to individuals that are in acute withdrawal seeking relief from symptoms.
  • The risks largely come from improper use or abuse of MAT medication.
  • General side effects include nausea, muscle aches and irritability.

Generally, MAT is designed to save lives as well as improve quality of life for those who suffer from opioid use disorder.

When do I stop taking MAT medication?

MAT does not have a timeline of when the medication needs to be stopped. When it comes to Buprenorphine/Naloxone, patients can take the medication for life if that is their wish and their prescribing provider has determined it’s the best course of action. Gradually lowering the dose of Buprenorphine/Naloxone a patient gets over time until the medication is no longer required is called tapering. This is not a requirement of treatment however, and again this is only done if the patient and provider both agree that this is the best decision.

 

For an appointment call for availability 518-719-3580

For more information about MAT visit: https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment